The New Tulsa Sound
The New Tulsa Sound profile pic
Genres
Rock, Blues, Jazz, Folk, Americana
Location
Tulsa, OK
Labels
Horton Records
Website
http://www.hortonrec...
Social

The New Tulsa Sound

Fassler Hall presents THE NEW TULSA SOUND Vol. 2:  The Church Studio Sessions is a compilation of established and emerging Tulsa artists. It's an amalgamation of styles and sounds that somehow works in a magical way with the common threads being quality musicianship and the city of Tulsa.

In February 2012, a group of Tulsa musicians came together for 10 days at the legendary Church Studio in Tulsa, OK to share each others' spirit of collaboration and community.  Much like their highly revered and deeply respected predecessors and originators of the Tulsa Sound, this family of artists exudes a similar, unique musical quality that continues to pour from this place.  This recording documents the fellowship that was experienced at those sessions.  It was a magical moment in time with smiles, laughter, and even tears of joy and fulfillment.  They hope you feel some of that same love and spirit and pass it on.  Peace from Tulsa! 

The first installment of this compilation, The Colony presents THE NEW TULSA SOUND Vol. 1, was released in June 2010 and features 18 artists from the Tulsa melting pot of music.  Both releases are available from Horton Records.

Discography

  • Discography Entry
  • Discography Entry

Members

  • Paul Benjaman Band
    Pic of Paul Benjaman Band
    Role / Instrument:
    Builds on the classic Tulsa Sound with a sense of groove that covers most styles of American music
    Influences:
    J.J. Cale, Leon Russell, Warren Haynes
    Member Profile
  • Pilgrim
    Pic of Pilgrim
    Role / Instrument:
    More of that Tulsa Sound with a mix of rock, funk, country, and blues with a high-energy, tight delivery
    Influences:
    Wilco, J.J. Cale, John Prine
    Member Profile
  • Wink Burcham
    Pic of Wink Burcham
    Role / Instrument:
    Witty, heartfelt songs ranging from old-fashioned country, to grass-roots folk, and Motown-inspired blues
    Influences:
    John Prine, Townes Van Zandt, Ben Harper
    Member Profile
  • The Panda Resistance
    Pic of The Panda Resistance
    Role / Instrument:
    Instrumental pieces drifting between danceable anthems, merciless post-rock ditties, and experimental love songs
    Influences:
    Mogwai, Do Make Say Think, Explosions in the Sky
    Member Profile
  • Desi and Cody
    Pic of Desi and Cody
    Role / Instrument:
    An eclectic blend of folk, rock, and country with a dash of pop familiarity – oozing beautiful melancholy and modern romance
    Influences:
    The Civil Wars, The Head & The Heart, June Carter & Johnny Cash
    Member Profile
  • Dead Sea Choir
    Pic of Dead Sea Choir
    Role / Instrument:
    An epic marriage of cinematic landscapes and indie-pop sensibilities
    Influences:
    Radiohead, My Morning Jacket, Sigur Ros
    Member Profile
  • Fiawna Forte'
    Pic of Fiawna Forte'
    Role / Instrument:
    Roaring, guitar-swinging, barefoot banshee
    Influences:
    Chrissy Hynde, Concrete Blonde, PJ Harvey
    Member Profile
  • Refund Division
    Pic of Refund Division
    Role / Instrument:
    Indie alternative with a Euro-pop feel
    Influences:
    Pedro the Lion, The Cardigans, Phantom Planet
    Member Profile
  • Dustin Pittsley Band
    Pic of Dustin Pittsley Band
    Role / Instrument:
    A unique combination of different genres, blending blues, rock, jazz, and jam band
    Influences:
    Gov't Mule, Allman Brothers Band, Doyle Bramhall
    Member Profile
  • Vandevander
    Pic of Vandevander
    Role / Instrument:
    Molten blues and greasy rock grooves wrapped together - emotionally raw and transparent
    Influences:
    The White Stripes, ZZ Top, Led Zeppelin
    Member Profile
  • Gogo Plumbay
    Pic of Gogo Plumbay
    Role / Instrument:
    Definitely jazz. definitely not jazz
    Influences:
    Galactic, Medeski Martin & Wood, JFJO
    Member Profile
  • Steve Pryor
    Pic of Steve Pryor
    Role / Instrument:
    Blues Americana that also taps the roots of rock, jazz, and country - a Tulsa guitar legend
    Influences:
    Freddie King, Jimi Hendrix, Steve Kimock
    Member Profile
  • Whirligig
    Pic of Whirligig
    Role / Instrument:
    Roots-based jam band goodness with laid back rhythms and smooth, delicious guitar tones
    Influences:
    Allman Brothers Band, The Band, Grateful Dead
    Member Profile
  • And There Stand Empires
    Pic of And There Stand Empires
    Role / Instrument:
    Densely orchestrated instrumental music, at times slow and melodic and at other times heavy, distorted and dark
    Influences:
    Do Make Say Think, Russian Circles, Sun Ra
    Member Profile
  • Low Litas
    Pic of Low Litas
    Role / Instrument:
    Indie shoe-gaze garage rock trio
    Influences:
    My Bloody Valentine, Pixies, Sonic Youth
    Member Profile
  • Jesse Aycock
    Pic of Jesse Aycock
    Role / Instrument:
    A unique brand of early rock, folk, psychedelic, and country with lyrics straight from the soul
    Influences:
    Neil Young, Ryan Adams, Gram Parsons
    Member Profile
Top

Media

Photographs

  • Jesse Aycock
  • Steve Pryor & Dustin Pittsley
  • Gogo Plombay
  • Mandi Larsen of Low Litas
  • Fiawna Forte
  • Costa Stasinopoulos of Dead Sea Choir
  • Desi and Cody
  • The Panda Resistance
  • Wink Burcham
  • Beau Roberson of Pilgrim
  • Paul Benjaman

Audio

Them Tulsa Boys - PAUL BENJAMAN BANDFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Easy People - PILGRIMFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Town In Oklahoma - WINK BURCHAMFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Agnes & Myrtle - THE PANDA RESISTANCEFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Big Dream - DESI & CODYFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Nemesis - DEAD SEA CHOIRFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Crying Tree - FIAWNA FORTEFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Dying of Thirst - REFUND DIVISIONFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
The Ocean - DUSTIN PITTSLEY BANDFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
The Wicked Dance - VANDEVANDERFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Okie Locate - GOGO PLUMBAYFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Heat - WHIRLIGIGFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Dark Dirt Road - STEVE PRYORFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Working - AND THERE STAND EMPIRESFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Busted - LOW LITASFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →
Love Is Life - JESSE AYCOCKFassler Hall presents The New Tulsa Sound Vol. 2: The Church Studio SessionsPlay →

Video

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Press

When Brian Horton gets on a roll, proselytizing about the live music renaissance currently under way in Tulsa, he’s as fervent as an evangelist. He will make a believer out of you. “Tulsa has so much amazing talent,” he says. “And we’ve got such a rich history. We need to embrace it. We need to be bold and start letting the rest of the country know what’s going on here: Tulsa is a music city.” And Horton is someone who would know. See live music any night of the week and you’re likely to see him pop in with his camera, shoot some video of the performance, and pop back out just as quickly to do the same thing at another venue. By all accounts, he seems to be everywhere at once. Given his ubiquity on the scene, you’d never guess Horton spends his days navigating the ebb and flow of the oil and gas industry as manager of corporate planning and analysis for Williams. Click here for more on Horton Records and the Tulsa music scene But it’s that unique combination — a devout passion for Tulsa music and a well-honed knack for business and organization — that led Horton to his newest venture: Horton Records, a nonprofit label aimed at spreading Tulsa music to as many eyes and ears as possible, in the surrounding region and beyond. “He just started as a fan,” says singer-songwriter Wink Burcham, who has released two albums on the Horton Records label. “But he wanted to help and, more importantly, he knew how to help. He has done a lot for this community of musicians.” The journey from casual fandom to founder and president of a record label wasn’t a calculated move on Horton’s part. Over time, it just sort of happened. “I started meeting a lot of these musicians at shows at McNellie’s or The Colony, and a lot of them became good friends,” Horton says. “I started seeing this music scene really grow and develop over the last few years, and there hasn’t been a plateau. It just keeps getting better and better. So, I said, ‘I want to help these folks. I want to be a part of this.’” Horton began filming and photographing local musicians’ performances with his point-and-shoot camera, and posting photos and videos to Facebook and YouTube. Before he knew it, he was putting up money for bands to produce and release CDs, making deals with local retailers to stock and sell those CDs, creating marketing materials, booking shows, making posters — anything to promote Tulsa music, Horton was on it. “Without even realizing what he was doing, he had been running a record label,” says Bo Hallford, bassist for Paul Benjaman Band and Panda Resistance, both of which have released albums on the label. Horton decided to formally incorporate the outfit as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit in September 2011, but by that time he had already been releasing albums under the Horton Records name. A trip to Austin’s South By Southwest music and film festival in 2010 spawned an idea that ramped up the burgeoning label’s momentum. “I just kept thinking, ‘I wish I had a compilation to hand people so they could hear a big cross-section of Tulsa music,’” he says. “I saw all these bands down there trying to get their music out there, and every band is working just as hard as the next. I thought, ‘We could really get a lot more bang for our buck if we could all work together.’” So, Horton sat down with Brian Fontaine, general manager of the bar division for The McNellie’s Group (which owns The Colony, Fassler Hall and other hotspots for original local music) and pitched the idea of partnering to create a compilation of some of Tulsa’s best musicians. The result was the 2010 release “The Colony Presents: The New Tulsa Sound,” a title that, according to Horton, was meant to pay respect to the legacy of the world-famous “Tulsa Sound” movement of the ’50s and ’60s while trumpeting a new era of great Tulsa musicians carrying on that legacy. The compilation was so well received that Horton and Fontaine once again teamed up and arranged for a handful of musicians and bands to enter the historic Church Studio to record new original songs for “Fassler Hall Presents: The New Tulsa Sound Volume 2, the Church Studio Sessions,” set for a late-September release. Horton says the feeling of camaraderie and collaboration during the two weeks of studio sessions only strengthened the communal bond shared by the musicians. “There were just smiles all over,” he says. “I went into the next room a couple of times and just teared up, I was so happy and overjoyed to see what was going on. Other people told me the same thing. It was magical.” Finding ways to spread that magic farther and farther is the next step for the label, Horton says. He has plans in the works to try to get songs placed in movie soundtracks and commercials. He helped organize a series of Saturday concerts, which began in September and feature acts from his label, at the new Guthrie Green in the Brady Arts District. He says he’d love to put together tours, branded with “The New Tulsa Sound” moniker and featuring multiple bands from the label, to bring Tulsa musicians exposure in new markets. “We’ve proven we can put music out and it pays for itself,” he says. “We’ve proven that there’s a demand for the product. “I really think the next step is raising awareness, and that’s not just about these bands, but about the city of Tulsa. We’ve got such a vibrant, creative community here. We have to support it and we have to get the word out about it.” Yet with all the work he has done to help shine a spotlight on the Tulsa music scene, Horton is quick to deflect any credit or accolades. “It’s not about me,” he says emphatically. “There would be no Horton Records without great musicians, great bands and great people.” Lucky for Horton, and for all of us, Tulsa has a plentiful supply of all of the above.

— TulsaPeople (Oct 1, 2012)